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IV. Talking Pots (Exercises in Clinicopathologic Correlation)

Here are some pictures and talking pots, focusing on Clinicopathologic Correlation. Test yourself:

  • Can you pick up the main pathology?
  • Can you see anything else? (Cause and Effect)
  • Can you work out the likely clinical manifestations?
  • What do you think the imaging would look like?
  • What is the pathogenesis of this condition?

 

1. Crooked spine

Mr Lee, a 77 year old man, was noticed to have a pronounced hunch. Here is an example of what his spine would look like. Can you work out the diagnosis?

Here is the “talking pot”. Pay attention to how the pathology correlates with the clinical aspects.

If you can’t play the video, watch it here on YouTube: https://youtu.be/YvEabsHFD8Y

2.Lower limb tumour

Have a look at this picture. Can you work out the diagnosis?

How will this patient initially present? Look at the video below for the diagnosis and clinicopathologic correlation. Did you pick up everything?

If you can’t play the video, watch it here on YouTube: https://youtu.be/Bv8SMVOmxUM

3.  A swollen knee

Here is another gross pathology specimen. The diagnosis should be quite apparent from the gross appearance and the location withini the long bone (recall the diagram on the previous page).

Can you figure it out?

Can you tell if this is a teenager or adult? How?

 

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Click on the “Talking Pot” below to see if you got it right.

If you can’t play the video, watch it here on YouTube: https://youtu.be/keTb3EMDSek

4. A painful appendage

Here is a picture of a structure that is very commonly used. What is it? What is the main pathology?

What is the pathogenesis and natural history?

This video highlights the diagnosis and clinicopathologic correlation

If you can’t play the video, watch it here on YouTube: https://youtu.be/x1o5guGC6IE

5. A bad limp

Mr Abdullah, 52, complains of backache, as well as a painful left knee. He has had a pronounced limp ever since a bad motor vehicular accident some years ago.  In this picture, you see one of his leg bones. Can you identify WHICH bone this is? What is the abnormality? What was the previous injury he had? Can you figure out why he has back and knee pain?

For answers, click on the Talking Pot below.

If you can’t play the video, watch it here on YouTube: https://youtu.be/oKQYR4vs1wg

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